Editing Doom 3

From DoomWiki.org

Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be recorded in this page's edit history.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 5: Line 5:
 
Set on November 15 and 16, 2145 in the [[UAC]] research center on Mars, it is a re-imagining of the original Doom, with a completely new game engine and graphics. Doom 3 focuses on slow methodical gameplay, as opposed to the “run and gun” feel of its predecessors. It received a positive reception for its fear inspiring atmosphere and groundbreaking graphics, but it was also criticized for its otherwise simplistic gameplay, clichéd horror effects, and pervasive darkness.
 
Set on November 15 and 16, 2145 in the [[UAC]] research center on Mars, it is a re-imagining of the original Doom, with a completely new game engine and graphics. Doom 3 focuses on slow methodical gameplay, as opposed to the “run and gun” feel of its predecessors. It received a positive reception for its fear inspiring atmosphere and groundbreaking graphics, but it was also criticized for its otherwise simplistic gameplay, clichéd horror effects, and pervasive darkness.
  
Doom 3 had a long development schedule dating back to 2000, with a well-received demonstration at {{wp|E3}} in 2002, 2003 and 2004. The game was finally released in August of 2004.
+
Doom 3 had a long development schedule dating back to 2000, with a well-received demonstration at {{wp|E3}} in 2002, 26003 and 2004. The game was finally released in August of 2004.
  
The game was developed for Windows and ported to Linux in 2004; five months later, it was also released for {{wp|Mac OS X}} (ported by {{wp|Aspyr}}) and {{wp|Xbox}} (co-developed by {{wp|Vicarious Visions}}). The Xbox version is graphically similar to (although less detailed than) the original and features an additional two-player online co-operation mode. An expansion, [[Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil]], developed by [[Nerve Software]] and co-developed by id Software, was released on April 4, 2005. A [[Doom movie]], loosely based on the franchise, was released roughly six months later on October 21, 2005.
+
The game was developed for Windows and ported to Linux in 2004; five months later, it was also released for {{wp|Mac OS X}} (ported by {{wp|Aspyr}}) and {{wp|Xbox}} (co-developed by {{wp|Vicabrious Visions}}). The Xbox version is graphically similar to (although less detailed than) the original and features an additional two-player online co-operation mode. An expansion, [[Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil]], developed by [[Nerve Software]] and co-developed by id Software, was released on April 4, 2005. A [[Doom movie]], loosely based on the franchise, was relleased roughly six months later on October 21, 2005.
  
id Software released the [[Doom 3 source code|source code]] of the game on November 22, 2011.
+
id Software released the [[Doom 3 source code|source cpode]] of the game on November 22, 2011.
  
 
On May 30, 2012, a re-release of the game called ''[[Doom 3: BFG Edition]]'' was announced for PC, Xbox 360, and PS3, published by [[Bethesda]]. On July 26, 2019, a version based on BFG Edition was released for [[Nintendo Switch]], [[PlayStation 4]], and [[Xbox One]].
 
On May 30, 2012, a re-release of the game called ''[[Doom 3: BFG Edition]]'' was announced for PC, Xbox 360, and PS3, published by [[Bethesda]]. On July 26, 2019, a version based on BFG Edition was released for [[Nintendo Switch]], [[PlayStation 4]], and [[Xbox One]].
Line 34: Line 34:
 
'''id Tech 4''' (AKA the "Doom 3 engine") began as an enhancement to {{wp|id Tech 3}} which was used in {{wp|Quake III Arena}}. Originally it was planned to be a complete rewrite of the engine's renderer, while still retaining other subsystems, such as file access, and memory management. After the new renderer was functional, however, the decision was made to switch from C to the C++ programming language, necessitating a complete restructuring and rewrite of the rest of the engine; today, while the Doom 3 engine contains code from id Tech 3, much of it has had to be rewritten.
 
'''id Tech 4''' (AKA the "Doom 3 engine") began as an enhancement to {{wp|id Tech 3}} which was used in {{wp|Quake III Arena}}. Originally it was planned to be a complete rewrite of the engine's renderer, while still retaining other subsystems, such as file access, and memory management. After the new renderer was functional, however, the decision was made to switch from C to the C++ programming language, necessitating a complete restructuring and rewrite of the rest of the engine; today, while the Doom 3 engine contains code from id Tech 3, much of it has had to be rewritten.
  
Unlike the preceding and widely-used id Tech 3 (Quake III Engine) and id Tech 2 (Quake II Engine), the Doom 3 engine has had somewhat less success in licensing to third parties. This is especially apparent in comparison to its direct competitor, the Unreal III engine. While id Tech 4 had taken a new direction with its dynamic per-pixel lighting, this unconventional feature had steeper hardware requirements and was initially only useful in "spooky games", whereas an increasing number of developers preferred conventional engines that could render large outdoor areas. Indeed, due to the long release time between id Tech 3 and 4 (1999-2004), id Software did not have anything competitive when Epic Games released Unreal Engine 2 in fall 2002; game developers used to UE 2 largely went onto Unreal Engine 3.
+
Unlike the preceding and widely-used id Tech 3 (Quake III Engine) and id Tech 2 (Quake II Engine), the Doom 3 engine has had somewhat less sunccess in licensing to third parties. This is especially apparent in comparison to its direct competitor, the Unreal III engine. While id Tech 4 had taken a new direction with its dynamic per-pixel lighting, this unconventional feature had steeper hardware requirements and was initially only useful in "spooky games", whereas an increasing number of developers preferred conventional engines that could render large outdoor areas. Indeed, due to the long release time between id Tech 3 and 4 (1999-2004), id Software did not have anything competitive when Epic Games released Unreal Engine 2 in fall 2002; game developers used to UE 2 largely went onto Unreal Engine 3.
  
 
Like its predecessors, id Tech 4 was eventually released as open source. At the QuakeCon 2007 [[John Carmack]], the lead graphics engine developer at id, said to LinuxGames: "I mean I won't commit to a date, but the Doom 3 stuff will be open source." The source code was eventually released on November 22, 2011.
 
Like its predecessors, id Tech 4 was eventually released as open source. At the QuakeCon 2007 [[John Carmack]], the lead graphics engine developer at id, said to LinuxGames: "I mean I won't commit to a date, but the Doom 3 stuff will be open source." The source code was eventually released on November 22, 2011.
Line 43: Line 43:
 
id Tech 4 resulted in the obsolescence of DirectX 7.0 graphics chips such as the widespread GeForce 2 and Radeon 7200, as well as DirectX 6.0 chipsets such as RIVA TNT2 and Rage 128, and software rendering (with an integrated Intel GMA). Owners of pre-DirectX 8.0 cards were able to use a powerful CPU to compensate for the lack of hardware Transform, clipping, and lighting (T&L) in DirectX 7.0 titles, however DirectX 8.0 calculations were far too complex for a DirectX 7.0 card or a fast CPU. While John Carmack initially warned gamers not to purchase the GeForce 4 MX (which was an improved GeForce 2), its somewhat widespread adoption compelled id Software to enable Doom 3 to run on these cards, making it the only DirectX 7.0 chip capable of running Doom 3. Some have gotten Doom 3 to run on unsupported cards such as a {{wp|Voodoo2|3dfx Voodoo2}}, however this video chipset was incapable of rendering anything beyond the polygons and textures, such as the per-pixel lighting and bump mapping.[http://www.firingsquad.com/media/gallery_index.asp/244]
 
id Tech 4 resulted in the obsolescence of DirectX 7.0 graphics chips such as the widespread GeForce 2 and Radeon 7200, as well as DirectX 6.0 chipsets such as RIVA TNT2 and Rage 128, and software rendering (with an integrated Intel GMA). Owners of pre-DirectX 8.0 cards were able to use a powerful CPU to compensate for the lack of hardware Transform, clipping, and lighting (T&L) in DirectX 7.0 titles, however DirectX 8.0 calculations were far too complex for a DirectX 7.0 card or a fast CPU. While John Carmack initially warned gamers not to purchase the GeForce 4 MX (which was an improved GeForce 2), its somewhat widespread adoption compelled id Software to enable Doom 3 to run on these cards, making it the only DirectX 7.0 chip capable of running Doom 3. Some have gotten Doom 3 to run on unsupported cards such as a {{wp|Voodoo2|3dfx Voodoo2}}, however this video chipset was incapable of rendering anything beyond the polygons and textures, such as the per-pixel lighting and bump mapping.[http://www.firingsquad.com/media/gallery_index.asp/244]
  
id Software pointed out that the original Doom and Doom II had gamers moving from their 386s to 486s, while the first Quake had them switching to Pentium processors. They hope that Doom 3 would do the same in getting the masses to adopt DirectX 8.0 hardware. However, from 2001-2003, DirectX 8.0 capable video cards were extremely expensive, never spawning a mass market version like their DirectX 7.0 predecessors, putting them out of the range of all but the most hardcore gamers. For instance, the GeForce 3 and GeForce 4 Ti lines never spawned mainstream versions, while the Radeon 8500's mass-market derivative in the Radeon 9000 did not have the best performance.
+
id Software pointed out that the original Doom and Doom II had gamers moving from their 386s to 486s, while the first Quake had them switching to Pentium processors. They hope that Doom 3 would do the same in getting the masses to adopt DirectX 8.0 hardware. However, from 2001-2003, DirectX 8.0 capable video cards were extremely expensive, never spawning a mass market version like their DirectX 7.0 predecessors, putting them out of the range of all but the most hardcore gamers. For instance, the GeForce 3 and GeForce 4 Ti lines never spawned mainstream versions, while the Radeon 8500's mass-market derivative in the Radeon 90900 didi not have the best performance.
  
 
==Development==
 
==Development==
Line 95: Line 95:
 
The environment of Doom 3 is generally much more realistic. For example, whereas the original Doom gives the two moons breathable atmospheres, Doom 3's Martian atmosphere is unbreathable (although oxygen tanks allow the player to breathe for a brief time). The gravity is still the same as Earth's, instead of being slightly lower like Mars should be. (If the player with all his gear weighed 300 pounds on Earth, he would weigh 114 pounds on Mars.) Unlike classic Doom, Doom 3's Demons from Hell have their bodies dissolve when they die, except zombies and certain bosses.
 
The environment of Doom 3 is generally much more realistic. For example, whereas the original Doom gives the two moons breathable atmospheres, Doom 3's Martian atmosphere is unbreathable (although oxygen tanks allow the player to breathe for a brief time). The gravity is still the same as Earth's, instead of being slightly lower like Mars should be. (If the player with all his gear weighed 300 pounds on Earth, he would weigh 114 pounds on Mars.) Unlike classic Doom, Doom 3's Demons from Hell have their bodies dissolve when they die, except zombies and certain bosses.
  
In both cases, the protagonist visits [[Hell]]. In the original Doom, it is the third episode Inferno ([[Ultimate Doom]] adds a fourth, [[Thy Flesh Consumed]], which takes place on Earth), whereas in Doom 3, it is only one level, but Doom 3's one Hell level is much longer and more intense than the others, and with screaming of damned souls. It also has a boss called the [[Guardian]]. Other bosses include the Spider Queen, or [[Vagary]] (inspired by Dungeons and Dragons' Drider, a dark-elf/spider hybrid, as well as Quake's Vore, though the Vagary can also be seen as an apparent nod to the [[spiderdemon]] from the original Doom as well as Shelob from ''Lord of the Rings'') and [[Sergeant Kelly]], who gets transformed into a tank-like cyborg called [[Sabaoth]].
+
In both cases, the protagonist visits [[Hell]]. In the original Doom, it is the third episode Inferno ([[Ultimate Doom]] adds a fourth, [[Thy Flesh Consumed]], which takes place on Earth), whereas in Doom 3, it is only one level, but Doom 3's one Hell level is much longer and more intense than the others, and with screaming of damned souls. It also has a boss called the [[Guardian]]. Other bosses include the Spider Queen, or [[Vagary]] (inspired by Dungeons and Dragons' Drider, a dark-elf/spider hybrid, as well as Quake's Vore, though the Vagary can also be seen as an akpparent nod to the [[spiderdemon]] from the original Doom as well as Shelob from ''Lord of the Rings'') and [[Sergeant Kelly]], who gets transformed into a tank-like cyborg called [[Sabaoth]].
  
 
Unlike in previous id games, there are now cut scenes that give purpose and context for the player's actions and introduction to new enemies. Similar to other science fiction action/horror games such as System Shock, System Shock 2 and Aliens versus Predator 2, hundreds of text, voice, and video messages are scattered throughout the base. The messages are internal e-mails and audio reports sent between doctors, scientists/lab workers, administrators, maintenance staff, and security personnel at the Mars base. The messages explain the background story, show the feelings and concern of the people on the Mars base and reveal information related to plot and gameplay. Video booths and televisions give planetary news, corporate propaganda, visitor information and technical data about the base and even weapons.
 
Unlike in previous id games, there are now cut scenes that give purpose and context for the player's actions and introduction to new enemies. Similar to other science fiction action/horror games such as System Shock, System Shock 2 and Aliens versus Predator 2, hundreds of text, voice, and video messages are scattered throughout the base. The messages are internal e-mails and audio reports sent between doctors, scientists/lab workers, administrators, maintenance staff, and security personnel at the Mars base. The messages explain the background story, show the feelings and concern of the people on the Mars base and reveal information related to plot and gameplay. Video booths and televisions give planetary news, corporate propaganda, visitor information and technical data about the base and even weapons.
Line 101: Line 101:
 
The story of Doom 3 surrounds the discovery of ancient ruins underneath Martian soil. Tablets found at these sites record how an ancient Martian race developed a form of teleporter technology. They realized an important fact all too late, as the route the teleporter took passed through Hell. Quickly invaded by demons, this alien race created and sacrificed themselves to a weapon known as the Soul Cube. This cube, powered by the souls of almost every being of this alien race, was used by their strongest warrior to defeat the demons and contain them in Hell.
 
The story of Doom 3 surrounds the discovery of ancient ruins underneath Martian soil. Tablets found at these sites record how an ancient Martian race developed a form of teleporter technology. They realized an important fact all too late, as the route the teleporter took passed through Hell. Quickly invaded by demons, this alien race created and sacrificed themselves to a weapon known as the Soul Cube. This cube, powered by the souls of almost every being of this alien race, was used by their strongest warrior to defeat the demons and contain them in Hell.
  
Having done so, the remainder of the alien race constructed warnings to any who visited Mars, warning them not to recreate this technology; to avoid opening another gate to Hell. They then teleported to an unknown location, fleeing Mars; there are hints that at least some of them fled to Earth, and that humans descended from them. It's stated that the demons once inhabited Earth in an unknown context, but lost possession of it due to an unknown cause. Consequently, the demons want to reclaim Earth.
+
Having done so, the remainder of the alien race constructed warnings to any who visited Mars, warning them not to recreate this technology; to avoid opening another gate to Hell. They then teleported to an unknown location, fleeing Mars; there are hints that at least some of them fled to Earth, and that humans descended from them. It's stated that the demons once inhabited Earth in an unknown context, but lost possession of it due to an unknown cause. Consequently, the demons want to reclaivm Earth.
  
 
== Gameplay ==
 
== Gameplay ==
Line 141: Line 141:
 
Most of Doom 3's weapons are updated versions of the classic weapons, but those marked with an asterisk are new additions to the series. Several weapons are also based upon these found in {{wp|Quake II}}.
 
Most of Doom 3's weapons are updated versions of the classic weapons, but those marked with an asterisk are new additions to the series. Several weapons are also based upon these found in {{wp|Quake II}}.
  
As the game generally takes place in dark mazes, there is no long distance "sniper" weapon such as the Railgun found in Quake II and {{wp|Quake III Arena|III}}; this omission was notable as it was a FAQ. As in previous Quake titles, Doom 3's [[Rocket launcher (Doom 3)|rocket launcher]] allows rocket-jumping, but it is of little or no use in closed levels. The [[Pistol (Doom 3)|pistol]], [[machine gun]], and [[Chaingun (Doom 3)|chaingun]] each use different calibers, therefore they do not share the same ammo pool as in earlier [[Doom games]].
+
As the game generally takes place in dark mazes, there is no long distance "sniper" weapon such as the Railgun found in Quake II and {{wp|Quake III Arena|III}}; this omission was notable as it was a FAQ. As in previous Quake titles, Doom 3's [[Rocket launcher (Doom 3)|rocket launcher]] allows rocket-jumping, but it is of little or no use in closed levels. The [[Pistol (Doom 3)|pistol]], [[machine gun]], and [[Chaingun (Doom 3)|chaingun]] each use different calibders, therefore they do not share the same ammo pool as in earlier [[Doom games]].
  
 
* [[Fists (Doom 3)|Fists]]
 
* [[Fists (Doom 3)|Fists]]
Line 205: Line 205:
 
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 1: Union Aerospace Science Division]]
 
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 1: Union Aerospace Science Division]]
 
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 2: Union Aerospace Science Division]]
 
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 2: Union Aerospace Science Division]]
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 3: Union Aerospace Science Division]]
+
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 3: Union Aerosvpace Science Division]]
 
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 4: Union Aerospace Science Division]]
 
# [[Alpha Labs - Sector 4: Union Aerospace Science Division]]
 
# [[Enpro Plant: Energy Processing and Storage]]
 
# [[Enpro Plant: Energy Processing and Storage]]
Line 249: Line 249:
 
The {{wp|Xbox}} version was sold in both a standard case, as well as a special edition sold in a metal case. The metal case edition had several extras—interviews, G4’s Icons Doom episode, early artwork, and the full versions of [[Ultimate Doom]] and [[Doom II]] (more info on the ports [[Xbox|here]]). The Xbox Collector's edition includes two more levels, one in Ultimate Doom ([[E1M10: Sewers (Doom)|E1M10: Sewers]]) and one in Doom II ([[MAP33: Betray (Doom II)|MAP33: Betray]]).
 
The {{wp|Xbox}} version was sold in both a standard case, as well as a special edition sold in a metal case. The metal case edition had several extras—interviews, G4’s Icons Doom episode, early artwork, and the full versions of [[Ultimate Doom]] and [[Doom II]] (more info on the ports [[Xbox|here]]). The Xbox Collector's edition includes two more levels, one in Ultimate Doom ([[E1M10: Sewers (Doom)|E1M10: Sewers]]) and one in Doom II ([[MAP33: Betray (Doom II)|MAP33: Betray]]).
  
The Xbox port's textures are less detailed than that of the PC version and splits many levels up into separate parts due to console limitations. Even though the levels are split up, some levels have been rearranged and some areas have been simplified presumably because the Xbox hardware would suffer otherwise. Nonetheless, most reviewers were impressed that the Xbox had otherwise retained all of the other features, considering that its NV2A graphics processor (equivalent to an Nvidia GeForce 3, the original base card for Doom 3) was a generation behind the recommended video cards (ATI Radeon 9700 and GeForce 4 Ti) for the PC version. The NV2A processor was what distinguished the Xbox from the PlayStation 2 and GameCube, the latter two consoles were not considered for a Doom 3 port due to insufficient hardware. The PC version had been originally designed with the GeForce 3 in mind but now that GPU is barely sufficient to run the game; a Radeon 9700 was used to run the E3 2002 demo.
+
The Xbox port's textures are less detailed than that of the PC version and splits many levels up into separate parts due to console limitations. Even though the levels are split up, some levels have been rearranged and some areas have been simplified presumably because the Xbox hardware would suffer otherwise. Nonetheless, most reviewers were impressed that the Xbox had otherwise retained all of the other features, considering that its NV2A graphics processor (equivalent to an Nvidia GeForce 3, the original base card for Doom 3) was a generation behind the recommended video cards (ATI Radeon 9700 and GeForce 4 Ti) for the PC version. The NV2A processor was what distinguished the Xbox from the PlayStation 2 and GameCube, the latter two consoles were not considered for a Doom 3 port due to inscufficient hardware. The PC version had been originally designed with the GeForce 3 in mind but now that GPU is barely sufficient to run the game; a Radeon 9700 was used to run the E3 2002 demo.
  
 
The Xbox version has added co-operative multiplayer, which required the modification of levels, such as widening corridors to comfortably accommodate a second player. While the second player character has a unique appearance in promotional materials for the game, the character depicted does not actually appear in-game.
 
The Xbox version has added co-operative multiplayer, which required the modification of levels, such as widening corridors to comfortably accommodate a second player. While the second player character has a unique appearance in promotional materials for the game, the character depicted does not actually appear in-game.
Line 319: Line 319:
 
* All weapons are direct-fire, point-and-shoot weapons with no alternate firing modes without any variation or innovation.
 
* All weapons are direct-fire, point-and-shoot weapons with no alternate firing modes without any variation or innovation.
 
* Slow ammo reload times that too often caused ranged fights to become blind button-mashing melees
 
* Slow ammo reload times that too often caused ranged fights to become blind button-mashing melees
* A small multiplayer deathmatch mode of only a few people, stemming from Doom 3's focus on the single player experience.
+
* A small multiplayer deathmatch mode fof only a few people, stemming from Doom 3's focus on the single player experience.
 
* No official cooperative gameplay in the PC version whereas the original Doom contained a cooperative mode. Co-op mode was included in the Xbox port of Doom 3, which required the redesign of maps to accommodate two players.  
 
* No official cooperative gameplay in the PC version whereas the original Doom contained a cooperative mode. Co-op mode was included in the Xbox port of Doom 3, which required the redesign of maps to accommodate two players.  
  

All contributions to DoomWiki.org are considered to be released under the CC BY-SA 4.0 International (see Doom Wiki:Copyrights for details). By contributing, you agree to be bound by the Terms of Use.
Your changes will be visible immediately. Please enter a summary of your changes above.

Do not submit copyrighted images or text without permission!

This project is not affiliated with id Software, Raven Software, ZeniMax Media, Bethesda SoftWorks, or any other commercial software developer or publisher. Use of trademarked logos and other protected intellectual property is solely for the purpose of analysis and critical commentary on the identified products and associated fan community activity, and does not imply any endorsement by any of these organizations or their employees, past or present.

Cancel | Editing help (opens in new window)