Revenant (Doom 2016)

From DoomWiki.org

A revenant.
This article is about the monster in Doom (2016). For other games, see:

The revenant makes its third return in Doom (2016), appearing as a skeleton covered with a thin layer of wet rotting flesh and sporting a pair of laser-guided homing rocket launchers. In a trait unique to the monster's incarnation in this game, it also sports a jet pack with which it can take flight at any time to avoid fire or to track down the player across virtually any terrain.

Tactical analysis[edit]

Health: 1600

Chainsaw Fuel Usage: 3

The revenant's rockets are more powerful than the player's rocket launcher, and it will use its aerial mobility to its advantage for both pursuit of the player and remaining out of reach while it fires off a surprisingly accurate barrage of rockets from above. While it does have a melee attack, it prefers to take to the skies if forced into close-quarters combat.

The engine on the revenant's jetpack is its weak spot, and it will be forced to land if it is struck in mid-flight. Furthermore, a successful glory kill from behind will send the revenant hurtling forward before it explodes, causing heavy damage to any other demons caught in the blast.

Attacks[edit]

Attack Too Young To Die Hurt Me Plenty Ultra Violence Nightmare
Melee ? ? ? ?
Rocket Barrage ? ? ? ?
Mid-air Barrage ? ? ? ?

Unique player kills[edit]

A revenant may pin down the player and, after delivering a series of brutal punches, will tear off the marine's arm and use it to bludgeon him to death. This was first seen at the 2014 QuakeCon private showing, and later displayed publicly at E3 2015.

Lore[edit]

The origin of the revenants found in the UAC Mars Base and connected areas of Hell was human rather than demonic, being the culmination of the Lazarus Project's efforts to transform human operatives into demonic soldiers. A methodical process of ante mortem cybernetic augmentation involving integration of the combined jetpack and dual rocket launcher harness would be carried out on test subjects without anesthesia, as the researchers believed this was necessary to enable the subject to be aware of and control the device after clinical death. An Argent-powered biochip would also be implanted into the subject's neural pathways beneath the brain.

This surgery would be followed up by repeated exposure to intense Lazarus waves, resulting in a dramatic and painful transformation over the course of three weeks. During this time, osseous proteins would be altered by Argent energy exposure to promote rapid skeletal growth, with the side effects of causing skin and connective tissue to be torn off of the bones and inducing the decay of internal organs even before the subject "died" by normal standards.

Sources[edit]