SnapMap

From DoomWiki.org

The blueprint mode in SnapMap, where modules can be added or manipulated.
The object mode in SnapMap. Interacting with this panel triggers logic to end the level.

SnapMap is the integrated editor in Doom (2016) that allows players to create and edit maps with their own structure and game logic. It can be used to assemble prefabricated rooms, place objects such as monsters and weapons, and define custom events within maps. Players can create maps for different modes, ranging from single-player levels, to co-operative or competitive multiplayer maps. When building a level, the game will shift to a top-down view where players can place pre-defined rooms and hallways to form a level. Additionally, they can make custom areas using blocking boxes or decorations. Players can also access the X-ray camera, which temporarily removes all the walls to allow players to view the objects inside.

Most of the game's enemies can be placed in SnapMap, with the exception of the summoner and campaign's bosses. Their artificial intelligence and stats, and the player's own movement speed, can also be modified. Players can also add additional particle effects, lighting effects, and other gameplay items like health packs and ammo pick-ups into their creations. Only in-game assets can be used; it is not possible to create or import custom models into the game. However, custom geometry can be crafted to a degree through clever use of clip volumes and placement of static props, the use of which became significantly more flexible as the editor was updated. Levels can be tested before they are published online.

For players who do not wish to create extensively, the game features an AI conductor which automatically generates enemies. Players will receive "snap points" after they create a level or play a level created by other users. These points can be used to unlock additional cosmetic items. Players can share their completed maps with other players. They can upvote or downvote maps, and can utilize other players' content as a base and share the results while citing the originals' authors. Maps can be permanently downloaded so that they remain available while offline.

Updates[edit]

Update 1[edit]

This update added sky/window props, as well as the ability to enable or disable shootable triggers. It also became possible for map authors to decide whether to let SnapMap auto-manage hand-placed AI.[1]

Update 2[edit]

This update included a large number of changes and additions to SnapMap, including the following:[2]

  • A large amount of Hell-themed content was added, including new modules, props, interactive objects such as the gore nest, and demonic voice speakers.
  • The Unwilling could now be added to maps as an enemy, while the mancubus could be selected as a player demon.
  • Launch pads were added that could be customized to control distance, speed and direction.
  • The EMG Mark V pistol, chainsaw and static rifle weapons could be added to maps. A customizable weapon wheel was added that allowed the player to hold any number of weapons.
  • Light objects could now be modified with blinking, strobing and rotating properties.

Update 3[edit]

Update 3 did not include any new content but fixed a number of issues.[3]

Update 4[edit]

This update included a large number of changes and additions to SnapMap, including the following:[4]

  • A large amount of Classic Doom-themed content was added, including setpiece modules, props, lifts, pickups, sounds and classic player deaths.
  • A decal tool was added allowing a variety of textures to be added to module surfaces.
  • The "Next Map Logic" object was added, allowing multi-level campaigns to be created.

Changes were also made to the Community Hub allowing new maps to be reviewed and recommended by the community, and to allow players to subscribe to authors and other players in order to get updates on their new content.

Update 5[edit]

This update allowed players to play as the Doom Slayer in his Praetor suit, and added Lazarus Labs-themed modules and props. It also allowed the creation of "persistent variables", allowing the player's status and equipment to be carried between levels in a multi-level campaign.[5]

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Bethesda Softworks (30 June 2016). "DOOM – Update #1 Now Available." Bethesda Softworks. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  2. Bethesda Softworks (29 July 2016). "DOOM – Free Update #2 Now Available." Bethesda Softworks. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  3. Bethesda Softworks (22 September 2016). "DOOM - Free Update #3 Now Available." Bethesda Softworks. Retrieved 24 September 2016.
  4. Bethesda Softworks (19 October 2016). "DOOM – Free Update 4 Adds Arcade Mode and Classic Modules." Bethesda Softworks. Retrieved 20 October 2016.
  5. Bethesda Softworks (7 December 2016). "DOOM – Free Update 5 Brings Bots, New Mode & Echelon 11." Bethesda Softworks. Retrieved 9 December 2016.

External links[edit]