Talk:Doom II music

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Map10 also sounds a BIT like Mandatory Suicide by Slayer. Anyone agree with this? ~Tom D

One of maps has also music, which sounds very like Eurythmics:Greetings From A Dead Man. I recommend to download and hear; I think it is map 26, or 28, I can't remember. --84.42.133.240 22:07, 26 July 2006 (UTC)

d_runnin sounds like hangar 18? who smoked that up? the two songs are nothing alike, not even superficially. ~dethtoll

It uses the exact same chord progression. Bloodshedder 00:43, 9 April 2007 (UTC)
i don't hear that at ALL. and i've been listening to both songs for years. ~dethtoll
(ps) can i have some sort of eminent proof here? gave both songs another listen and i just flatout don't hear it. give me tabs or something. ~dethtoll
Sure. Here. Things I did to make them match:
  • Sped up Hangar 18 by two semitones, without preserving the tempo.
  • Slowed down D_RUNNIN.MID to 85 tempo, recorded it to WAV format.
RUNNIN uses the same progression of chords as Hangar 18, except it is shifted up by two semitones: E+G+B (E minor), E+G+C, E+G+C#, E+G+D. Hangar 18 simply begins on D minor instead, and has the same upward shift of a single semitone of the highest note in the chord. RUNNIN has the additional quick move back down before the next bar starts. The same basic progression makes up the bulk of both songs. Bloodshedder 22:18, 9 April 2007 (UTC)
okay. i hear it now. but... i don't know, it seems a little coincidental, especially since d_runnin has to be sped up a bit. some of the others are much more obvious- a friend of mine who's never heard pantera commented that "rise" sounded like a doom remix rather than the other way around. none of the others need to be that significantly toyed with to hear any similarity, at least to my ear. 72.49.117.53 dethtoll
I've a question. The template states that the MUS for maps 20 and 26 is based on Slayer's "Skeletons of Society," but I can't find the similarities between the two. Can anyone help me find these similarities, please? Torq95 05:13, December 8, 2010 (UTC)

MAP04[edit]

To say MAP04 is based on Wolf3D music is like saying Beethoven's 6th symphony is based on his 5th. There are no similarities between MAP04 and Wolf 3D's "Zero Hour" except the same blues/rock patterns that are heard in a sizable portion of Bobby Prince music. And that's because it's Bobby Prince music. :) Zack 13:24, June 16, 2010 (UTC)

Intermission[edit]

King Crimson, really? I've been a fan of theirs for years and I can't hear the similarity between DM2INT and "Thela Hun Ginjeet" at all. 128.227.215.197 15:33, October 20, 2010 (UTC)

Double-checked[edit]

Unlike on the Doom article, I wouldn't contest any of the speculative source removals here. None of those songs sound anything like the corresponding Doom song to me. --Quasar (talk) 02:06, 25 May 2014 (UTC)

There are still three left that are unsourced, but they sounded so clearly similar that I left them in anyway. Fraggle (talk) 02:17, 25 May 2014 (UTC)

Pantera, lvl 18/27[edit]

is in fact inspired by the 1971 Album "the inner mounting flame" by The Mahavishnu Orchestra, first track "meeting of spirits" (also, this time audible without a doubt)

so give final credit to them please

thx,

hunne - doom player since 1993

posted 10. August 2018

That might be, but there are three other Doom songs that sound like they're inspired by Vulgar Display of Power, which makes the Pantera inspiration more plausible. If you can list other songs that sound like titles from The Inner Mounting Flame, then yeah you'll have a point. --Gez (talk) 08:17, 10 August 2018 (CDT)
I checked this out just for the benefit of the doubt. At best there's a passing similarity in the chord used in the song's main progression and that's where any similarity ends. I cannot find any citable sources that note a connection between the songs or their authors. The song is not credited as being sampled or having inspired This Love, and to boot, the artists in Mahavishnu are known to have successfully sued other bands that misused their music. So, no. This is a personal opinion until you can prove otherwise and will not be added here. --Quasar (talk) 09:03, 10 August 2018 (CDT)

Into Sandy's City[edit]

So where is the similarities to Sex Type Thing? I can hear none. There is indeed an unused track released by Romero that sounds like STT but it sounds nothing like D_IN_CIT. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by ABRACADABRA (talkcontribs) .

The main riff of "Into Sandy's City" is nearly verbatim. Compare https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hhu-OyHqZM at timestamp 0 with https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkhCNx-8Qos at timestamp 0. Bobby Prince has changed a couple of the harmonic inflections, as is his tendency, and has added a staccato rhythm thanks to the harpsichord orchestration, but the progressions are otherwise the same. --Quasar (talk) 10:19, 26 September 2018 (CDT)
No it's not. The progression is different, song structure is VERY different compared to the unused song and the instrumentation is not even close to the unused song while every other unused track resembles it's finished counetrpart (if there's any) to the point you can clearly hear basically the same song without having to guess. Furthermore, drum track and a bassline are completelly different like you can't even compare them. Speaking about song history Bobby Prince said that it's main melody was originally done with piano sound, so it's not even guitar to harpischord transition. You mentioned similarities of the main melody but this is where similarities ends. If you listen to other Doom tracks you may find that e1m1 and e3m3 also have similar progression between them but that doesn't mean it's the same song.

The Demon's Dead[edit]

Hello, the music of Doom II "The Demon's Dead" is very similar to the song Solitude by Candlemass, could you verify that? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 189.238.218.186 (talk)

The similarity is much less pronounced than that to the riff in the intro of "After All (The Dead)" IMO. It's hard to bring a definite answer because there's no solid proof the album Dehumanizer was part of the musical inspirations behind Doom's music, but we have to consider the probability that either Romero (who directed the soundtrack style) or Prince (who wrote it) knew about Black Sabbath vs. the probability they knew about Candlemass. The bands that we know for sure are there are all American (Alice in Chains, Slayer, Soundgarden, Stone Temple Pilots), except for AC/DC which is Australian (but was famous worldwide in the 90s, like Pantera, Metallica, and Iron Maiden). Black Sabbath is a British band but a pioneer of black metal and in the 90s they had Dio and a few other American band members with them. Dehumanizer was Black Sabbath's largest commercial success and it followed a US tour by the band. So I'd say the probability is pretty good there. Candlemass on the other hand is a Swedish group and it doesn't seem to have had much of an impact on American audience in the 1990s. Their album Ancient Dreams appear in 174th position in the US charts for 1988, but it doesn't contain "Solitude" and the rest of the band's discography doesn't appear at all in the charts. Remember, this was back when the Internet was rare and slow and the idea of streaming music through it would have seemed ridiculous, so for discovering music you were dependent on radio and discs. For these reasons I think it's just a coincidence; a lot of music sounds kinda like a lot of other music After All. --Gez (talk) 05:54, 1 September 2020 (CDT)